In Dada We Trust

'Dada Scrap Talk' by Jay Schwartz“You’ll never know why you exist, but you’ll always allow yourselves to be easily persuaded to take life seriously.”
– Tristan Tzara
“Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.”
– Winston Churchill

 

Warning: the following post contains dubious comments on DADA, globalism and organized religion. As such, those who are lactose intolerant should refrain from drinking milk while reading this text.

It strikes me odd that evolution has not sought fit to endow us humans with some form of hook on which to hang the countless labels that are hung on us as soon as we are born. As we draw our first breath in this world, the paperwork is already being processed, branding us with all manners of societal tags such as nationality, religion, sex and sometimes even class. Our freedom to choose our affiliations or even our belief systems are stripped from us way before we even have a clue … even in societies that supposedly espouse personal liberty and freedom.

The term ‘human rights’, for example, is usually defined by political persuasion and local or national law, rather than by some globally recognized understanding. By the same token, I can understand why some people are against globalism; they are afraid of losing themselves identity wise. This despite the fact that a hefty portion of their identities may have actually been prefabricated for them as youths, and without their knowledge or consent.

Tower of Babel: The_Lord confounds_the_languages_of_all_the_Earth.Moreover, ever since the infamous ‘Tower of Babel’, talk of globalism has been taboo. The biblical story suggests that at one time in the past, all of mankind spoke the same language and worked together for a common purpose … egoism (at least so says the Bible, a literary bastion of guilt-mongering). Upon their building a tall tower to reach heaven, God took note and went into ‘smite’ mode. Not only were these folks scattered to the four corners of the Earth by divine action, but also their languages were confused so that they could no longer communicate and cooperate. How convenient for later day organized religions, as well as racist and nationalistic concerns.

Still, as much as I value individual differences and cultures, I can’t help but feel that life would be so much simpler and more peaceful if we could all freely communicate with each other with perfect understanding, sharing the same social mindset and values. Instead, we have a constant ‘war of words’ fanning the flames of nationalism and territorialism, cultural factionalism, and ‘oh so touchy’ religious intolerance.  

Now, for the record, ‘babel’ is best defined as confusing noises made by a number of speakers. Enter Dada …

Hugo Ball's 1916 poem, "Karawane"In his Dada Manifesto of 1916, Hugo Ball questioned, “How does one achieve eternal bliss? By saying dada.” Indeed! Why embrace Dadaism? Why not? It contains the answer to the meaning of life and all existence. It’s everything and nothing, and also everywhere and nowhere. In other words, it’s just like God.

Now before the stones fly, let me explain. Dadaism must certainly be infused with godliness, as much as everything else in existence is … matter and anti-matter, art and anti-art, fascist and anti-fascist, freeze and antifreeze, climax and anticlimax, and even the Christ and Antichrist.

Okay, so you may say that I am grandstanding for some ‘pantheistic’ belief here … and in a sense you would be both right and wrong. Such is dada! So there you have it; world peace, if only in Dada we trust.

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My Other Posts On Dadaism

 

Suggested Reading

 

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